web 2.0

Sunday, October 16, 2011

11 Things to Know About Mayonnaise

1. The three building blocks of mayonnaise are

(1) raw egg yolks (!)
(2) vegetable oil
(3) vinegar

     Seasoning, mustard, and lemon juice may be added for flavor.

2. The source of the word “mayonnaise” is unknown, but one guess is that it is derived from moyeu, Old French for egg yolk.

3. Mayonnaise is made by slowly adding oil to an egg yolk, while whisking vigorously to disperse the oil. The resulting emulsion is what we spread on sandwiches and burgers.

4. Mayonnaise is mostly fat. a serving of one tablespoon (13 grams) contains 90 calories! No wonder “Hold the mayo” has become such a popular expression by weight watchers at fast food joints.

5. homemade mayonnaise will spoil after 3-4 days.

6. Contrary to popular belief , industrial mayo does not spoil if not refrigerated. Commercial mayonnaise is filled with acid and preservatives that can actually extend the life of salads by killing bacteria. The eggs used in prepared mayonnaise are pasteurized as well.

7. Hellmann’s (known as Best Foods west of the Rockies) is the leading US mayonnaise brand. It became part of multinational food conglomerate Unilever a few years ago. According to Unilever, it has over 50% market share.

8. Tartar sauce is mayonnaise spiced with pickled cucumbers and onion.

9. Thousand Island dressing is ketchup, pickle relish, assorted herbs and spices mixed into a mayonnaise base.
10. Ranch dressing is made of buttermilk, mayonnaise, and minced green onion.

11. In the Netherlands, mayonnaise, not ketchup, is the condiment of choice for french fries.

What to do at the supermarket:

If you can avoid mayonnaise, more power to you! Mustard can be used in many occasions instead of it. Also consider low-fat yogurt for some uses.

But if you do need mayo – try to use the smallest amount possible.

As for “light” mayo, with up to 60% less calories – unfortunately it just doesn’t taste the same. No amount of filler starches and fake flavorings can bring the same taste as real mayo. Just have it less often…

By Fooducate


Post a Comment